Movistar + offers this European series starring Patrick Dempsey and Alessandro Borghi

The beginning of ‘Devils’, the ruthless financial thriller recently released on Movistar Series, is reminiscent of ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’. But there’s no comedy or self-pity, here, just hidden interests, dirty tricks and betrayal. “Our water is called finance. It is unseen, odorless and for most people it is imperceptible. But if we’re the fish in the know, Massimo is the one who swims up behind you and you don’t even see him coming. He’s the shark,” says Dominic Morgan (Patrick Dempsey), director of one of the largest investment banks in London, while haranguing his employees, in this case the Massimo he’s referring to, the “shark”, is one Massimo Ruggero (Alessandro Borghi), Head of Operations, who sees his hopes for promotion to Deputy General Manager dashed when he becomes involved in a scandal that affects his wife, a drug addict and escort. In his search for the truth, Massimo will even challenge the influence of his own mentor as he is dragged into a dirty war waged by major interests and big-time speculators.

Massimo Ruggero (Alessandro Borghi) and Dominic Morgan (Patrick Dempsey). ‘Devils’.

This Italian miniseries, based on Guido Maria Brera’s best-selling novel ‘I Diavoli’, is set in 2011, at a time when one half of Europe was still struggling to claw its way out from under the fallen rubble commonly referred to as ‘the economic crisis’ while the IMF were screaming on about the imminent risk of a global recession. The character who breathes life into the representation of a tired and weary voters is Sofía Reyes, an Argentine hacker played by Spanish actress Laia Costa (‘Foodie Love’, ‘Victoria’) and who seeks to unmask the sinister interests of financial tycoons. One of the characters sums it up perfectly when they say, “Banking used to be a noble profession. But unfortunately, these days it seems to stoop ever lower…”

Although the first episode of ‘Devils‘, directed by Nick Hurran (‘Sherlock’, ‘Doctor Who’) and Jan Maria Michelini (‘The Medici’) doesn’t give off that addictive vibe, it does begin putting the pieces of the puzzle into place, one by one, until we get the full picture by following the remaining nine episodes. Patrick Dempsey (the unforgettable doctor Massif from ‘Grey’s Anatomy’) and Alessandro Borghi (known outside Italy for ‘Suburra’) gracefully navigate their course through the power play offered by this drama, which also features Kasia Smutniak, Lars Mikkelsen, Malachi Kirby, Paul Chowdhry, Pia Melcher, Harry Mitchell, Sallie Harmsen, and Michael Nouri.

Laia Costa as Sofía Reyes in ‘Devils’

Not one is innocent

In this grueling brainteaser, you’ll even find yourself not knowing who you can trust. And, careful you don’t get lost in the economic jargon that the fourteen members of the writers’ room (seven of whom are creators) penned for the mouths of the characters, without much time lost stopping to explain they whys and what-nots, so keep them eyes peeled…

Perhaps one of the best ways to thoroughly enjoy ‘Devils” is to go with the flow and allow yourself to be carried away by Massimo’s perverse, (and dare I ask, realistic?) approach: “They say the devil’s greatest trick is making us believe he doesn’t exist. But he’s real, as real as the water the fish swim in, as real as the finance flowing through this bank. I’ve looked into his eyes and I’ve seen the terrifying darkness of the reflection of my soul in his”. So, it only remains to celebrate the fact that European fiction won’t budge an inch, (or is it centimeter?) from its vocational calling and evidently still honored stance to make increasingly ambitious series. Even if they may not be everyone’s bag of fish.

‘Devils’.
Helena Cortés
Helena Cortés. Journalist (by profession) and audiovisual communicator, is the girl on TV on ABC and ABC Play. I was analyzing series and programs in ‘Non Stop People’ (Movistar +) and Cope and now you can listen in to it on ‘Las cinco letras’ of the ‘El enfoque’ program on Onda Madrid. Learning and lecturing on Journalism at Universidad Carlos III.