The series enters its final season firmly committed to its origins as the geopolitical thriller that deals with real-world goings-on

“Homeland” is the chronicle of self-survival. That of Carrie Mathison of course, because she’s got to be the character who has most often fallen into the demonic depths of modern fiction in the same series, and who’s been forced to find out who she really was while half the world are calling for her to be something different.

“Homeland” questions us and places ourselves in the complex mind of a protagonist who doubts even herself while trying to save the world

The first three seasons, the awards and prestige, came to an unexpected catharsis that forced series creators to reformulate the dramatic axes. This caused them to stop the nonsense and surrender without reservation to the geopolitical thriller that constantly flirts with real-world events. And this is where “Homeland” has shown its best facet; in the spy story that questions decisions made behind closed office doors and denounces our fear of everything that’s different from us, questioning us and placing ourselves in the complex mind of a protagonist who doubts even herself while trying to save the world.

Claire Dunes in “Homeland”

Thus, the series, one of the pioneers in feminizing the point of view of a traditionally masculine gender, has become the best reflection of American foreign policy. We like it because, however crazy its twists can be, it’s always felt feasible. We believe in the game of obscurities, manipulative presidents and evil goings-on in corporate interests. The eighth season, the final, is being very consistent with these principles and is somehow the synthesis of all its great themes.

The final season of “Homeland” is based on the real axes of the series: Carrie and Saul Berenson. The former, because she’s a metaphor for the fragility in a world full of latent threats in which conviction and the need for emotional shelter go hand-in-hand; the latter because he’s the symbol of what’s rotten in geopolitical conflicts, based on power struggles where the ones losing out are always the same.

Few modern series can actually boast about keeping this up and in good health for eight years

Scriptwriters and directors have been working towards a type of continuum with the series, and it shows in alternation of the intimate radiography of the characters and construction of a very solid intrigue around appearances. The show still knows how to squeeze every last drop of value from the bombshells (there’s an attack, for example, of clear Hitchcockian inspiration) and drags us into a universe of political drama which is as possible as it is plausible.

“Homeland”

Ok, so it might take a couple of seasons stuck in a sort of continuism and dragging that out further would have turned the series into a joke, but few modern series can actually boast about keeping this up and in good health for eight years. Proof of its influence is that, if you stop to think about its legacy, a good part of the current series of a similar genre (with “Jack Ryan” and “Messiah” at the head) are similar to it in one way or another.

We will miss Carrie and Saul, because their strange relationship would be the same as the one we’d have with them: we can see their flaws, but in the end they’re just like family.

Pep Prieto
Journalist and writer. Series critic on ‘El Món a RAC1’ and for the program “Àrtic” on Betevé. Author of the essay “Al filo del mañana”, about time-travelling cinema, and “Poder absoluto”, about cinema and politics.