The Good Fight is not a series about lawyers. It is, however, a series starring lawyers. But court cases are the least important feature. Season three opens with an episode that sees nobody presenting or solving any cases and, instead, is an episode closely related to the essence of a series that seeks to make a political statement about the world we live in. This desire to remain faithful to the series title has its origin in the original this spin-off comes from, The Good Wife, where the characters tackled timely issues. In this new series, creators Michelle and Robert King seem more interested right now in their opinion column than in the standard mechanics of a legal drama. It took them no longer than five minutes into episode one to bring up the #MeToo movement, which revolves around a crisis in the law firm when they discover that founder, Carl Reddick, a key figure in the African-American civil rights struggle, had been raping and abusing several workers for years.

The good fight

At the same time, the series recovers a plot from last season about a porn actress who had relations with Donald Trump, got pregnant and then the president paid for an abortion. The two plots are related through the way each “incident” is handled by those responsible: a confidentiality agreement that serves to cover up what happened and silence the victims. The partners of the firm are more concerned with the fall-out for the firm when the news breaks than for the victims. This includes Diane, the protagonist, who also agrees to the use of the very same type of agreement that she consider abhorrent when wielded by others like Donald Trump. Although the character is the star of the series and often the voice of the creators (and the audience), like when she delivers a veritable Shakespearean soliloquy on the type of man currently holding power, the screenwriters are also responsible for penning some pretty shady dealings like when Diane takes some clearly objectionable decisions, betraying the trust of the porn actress by selling her story to the media knowing full well the consequences it will have.

The good fight

Any series that airs its viewpoint on this many issues so vociferously is ethically required to undermine its protagonist in order to avoid appearing like they’re on some sort of ideological crusade. In this episode, public opinion is possibly best reflected by the character of Marissa, a supporting actress who has clearly made her stance as the voice of the younger generation. On the other hand, Maia has become a burden. Converted into comic relief, her subplot is the weak point of an episode that has truly brilliant moments, like Diane’s conversation about her husband’s wound or the song to explain to the audience what a confidentiality agreement is. There will be those who miss the trials, but with episodes like this one, The Good Fight firmly establishes its position as the ‘must-watch’ series to reflect on the world we live in. Sometimes with a smile, sometimes with a bitter aftertaste when you realize that this was an episode about the movement in which (almost) nobody really cares about the victims.

Toni de la Torre. Critic of television series. He works in El Món de Rac 1, El Tiempo, Qué hacemos, Ahora Crecimientos, Sàpiens and Web Crític. He has written several pounds on television series. Professor at the school to Showrunners BCN and likes to lecture on series. Highlights the Premi Bloc de Catalunya, 2014.